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Asthma Treatment in Adolescents and Adults by Dr Amarjit Mishra

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Asthma is a chronic respiratory disease characterized by inflammation and narrowing of the airways, which makes it difficult for the affected person to breathe. The airways in the lungs become swollen, narrow, and produce extra mucus, making it harder to breathe. Asthma symptoms can range from regular wheezing to a feeling of contraction in the chest. Often asthma patients find themselves feeling heavy while breathing or even coughing due to uneasiness. Asthma symptoms can range from moderate to severe, and they can be induced by a variety of things, including allergies, exercise, pollution, and stress. Asthma can be triggered by both hereditary and environmental causes.

While Asthma can develop at any age, it is common for adolescents and adults to develop asthma due to exposure to certain triggers, such as environmental allergens, pollution, tobacco smoke, and respiratory infections. Additionally, hormonal changes during puberty and adulthood can also contribute to the development of asthma in some individuals. In some cases, asthma may be triggered by occupational exposures, such as chemicals or dust in the workplace. Stress and emotional factors can also contribute to the development of asthma symptoms in some people. It’s important to note that not everyone who is exposed to these triggers will develop asthma, and individuals with a family history of asthma may be more likely to develop the condition. These days the frequency of asthma has increased amongst adolescents and adults but thankfully research scientists such as Amarjit Mishra of Auburn University have been playing a major role in developing a better understanding of Asthma and also finding therapeutic cure for the treatment of Asthma.

Amarjit Mishra is an extremely talented young researcher who has gained notoriety for his many successes throughout his early career. Amarjit Mishra, an Indian, is well known for his research on asthma and other respiratory conditions. He currently holds the position of Assistant Professor at Auburn University and is renowned for his relentless concentration on conducting research that would help society. His ground-breaking findings in the realm of asthma are greatly advancing our understanding of how asthma develops in both adults and adolescents. He has also been looking for potential therapeutic targets that may be studied in order to create pharmacological targets for the treatment of adult and juvenile asthma. His most recent research has concentrated on asthma brought on by allergies. If you didn’t know, possible allergens including pollen, dust mites, and pet dander—all known to aggravate asthma symptoms and signs—have been linked to allergy-induced asthma. It may also develop from food or skin sensitivities in certain teenagers.

Currently, the treatment of asthma in adolescents typically involves a combination of medications and lifestyle modifications. The goal of treatment is to control symptoms, prevent exacerbations, and improve quality of life. Some common approaches to treating asthma in adolescents include controller medications which are taken regularly to reduce airway inflammation and prevent asthma symptoms such as inhaled corticosteroids, leukotriene modifiers, and long-acting beta-agonists or quick-relief medications which are used as needed to quickly relieve asthma symptoms such as short-acting beta-agonists, anticholinergics, and oral corticosteroids. Asthma treatment currently also includes allergy shots which is also known as immunotherapy and which may be recommended to reduce sensitivity to allergens over time. However, the research conducted by Dr. Amarjit Mishra, Auburn University aims to further come up with a transformational solution for asthma so that the affected can be treated in a more effective manner.

Currently, there is ongoing research by Dr. Amarjit Mishra Ex-Assistant Professor of Auburn University, and many other research scientists to investigate the role of metabolic pathways in the development and progression of asthma, and how targeting these pathways may lead to more effective treatments for the condition. Some potential strategies being explored for treating asthma by targeting metabolic pathways includes modulating the metabolism of immune cells, targeting mitochondrial functions, modulating the gut microbiome, and targeting glucose metabolism. Under modulation of the metabolism of immune cells, the immune cells involved in asthma, such as T cells and eosinophils could be targeted to prevent their activation or function. For example, inhibiting certain metabolic pathways may reduce inflammation in the airways and prevent asthma symptoms. Further, altering mitochondrial function could impact the immune response and reduce asthma symptoms while there is some evidence to suggest that glucose metabolism may play a role in the development of asthma. Thus, targeting glucose metabolism pathways could be a strategy for reducing inflammation and preventing asthma symptoms.

By improving their knowledge of how immunometabolic pathways control airway inflammation and the genesis of asthma, Dr. Amarjit Mishra and his colleagues are working to develop promising new therapeutic approaches. One of the important metabolic alterations that Amarjit Mishra emphasises is the expression of pyruvate kinase M2. Antigen-presenting dendritic cells, which are dependent on immature mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and are controlled by AMPK signalling, start the allergic stimulus-induced Th2 inflammation. According to Dr. Amarjit Mishra, eosinophilic airway inflammation, subepithelial collagen deposition, and mucosal metaplasia caused by house dust mites were significantly reduced by inhibiting STAT3 phosphorylation. In addition, Dr. Mishra addresses the crucial metabolic adaptability of the mitochondrial Irg1/itaconate axis in regulating Th2 inflammation. The findings of Dr. Amarjit Mishra and his team imply that antigen absorption and priming, which are impacted by mitochondrial malfunction, have no effect on dendritic cell movement. According to the experts’ opinions, more research on the Irg1/itaconic acid axis is required to examine the immunomodulatory role in the effector function of dendritic cells and the Th2 inflammatory pathways that cause asthma. Amarjit Mishra has also highlighted the function of the FAO pathway in Th2 inflammation. These metabolic alterations in ILC2 result in decreased Th2 cytokine outputs and Th2-associated airway hyperreactivity. He highlighted the surprising discovery that ILC2 proliferation and effector activity, including the production of pro-allergenic cytokines IL25 and IL33, are suppressed by the inhibitory axis of programmed cell death protein-1 acting as a metabolic checkpoint.

Though he has been continuously engaged in conducting research to find a potential solution to asthma, Dr. Amarjit Mishra also believes that the occurrence of asthma amongst adolescents and adults can be reduced by inducing lifestyle modifications. According to him, adolescents with asthma should avoid triggers that can worsen symptoms, such as cigarette smoke, air pollution, and exercise-induced asthma. They should also maintain a healthy weight, get regular exercise, and manage stress.

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